The North East Coast of Mallorca to the bay of Pollença (Bahía de Pollença)

Cala Magraner ... the best place for a quick skinny-dip
Cala Magraner ... the best place for a quick skinny-dip

Leaving early from Porto Colom made for great pictures with the sun on behind us, facing the coast line. Again we had to sail past such lovely little Calas (like the Cala de Mallorca) but because we still need to have breakfast we’ve decided to have at least a very quick stop somewhere special and quiet. Cala Magraner was exactly it. When Johann said he will take me somewhere special, I just quietly sat there with my sleepy eyes thinking – I hope it does not mean picking up a mooring … it is hard work to do that in Mallorca because they often don’t have a rope attached to it that I can get to from the boat and once or twice it happened (after having a few rough words flying back and forth) that I had to use the dinghy to go around to the bow to take the bow lines from Johann in order to secure the boat! Shortly – a pain in the bud!
When he called me to drop the anchor I just could not believe the sight! High steep cliffs both sides of this very narrow cala – that narrow that only one yacht can fit into it and if you sway too much you could knock the one side of the cliff!. On beautiful white sand of 4 metres deep and water that clear you could see the little ripples in the sand made by the current, we dropped anchor. 9 am in the morning, no wind, already warmed up enough for a swim, I took my chances with not a sole in sight to have a quick dip !
Diving into the turquoise water was just what I needed instead of breakfast. Johann had to keep the engines ticking over as we keep drifting over the anchor and towards the sides. We did not do breakfast – but the stop was breathtakingly stunning!
And so was the rest of the coast…one after the other cute possible stop-overs but we need to make our way up to the most northern bay of Mallorca Island …Bahía de Pollença.

Bahía de Pollença
Bahía de Pollença
It is a huge bay with a few different settlements around it. All built up with a lot of development. We headed for Punta de la Avanzada with a lovely old lighthouse and a massive castle on the point- La Fortaleza is unfortunately in private hands and could not be explored! But anchoring just below this impressive castle provided a great view and we were content with that privilege!
Johann saving the skipper of a French boat and his dinghy!
Johann saving the skipper of a French boat and his dinghy!

This mooring had a bridle attached to it (thank goodness!!) and was pretty straight forward to pick up. As the wind came up later that afternoon, we were watching 3 French monohulls coming in having endless difficulty picking up their moorings. The first boat “caught” the mooring buoy with a loop in his bowline just to hold on to it (like in catching a calf from the back of a horse – which I thought was quite cleaver!) and then took his time tying the bowlines to the mooring. When boat no 2 came in, they struggled for about half an hour until their German neighbours came to the rescue with their dinghy. Then came the third one and boat no 1 decided to spare them the drama and embarrassment of the struggle and he went out on his dinghy in very wavy and windy conditions to go and take the lines of boat 3 and secure it to the mooring… well, halfway there he ran out of fuel and with now oars on the dingy he was drifting away from his yacht at a pretty quick pace. The bailer he used to row himself closer to the boat did not do the trick at all. When he was about 10 meters passed his boat he jumped into the water to try and swim his dingy back! A sure recipe for disaster! Johann hopped into Scollie (our dinghy) and went to the Frenchie’s rescue! Poor guy! They could not speak a word of English but their gestures made it clear that they were very appreciative for saving the skipper! The next morning Johann was rewarded with a bottle of French red wine which was very welcome as we ran out of red wine all together! This anchorage is known to get pretty gusty bullets of wind and we were slightly nervous leaving the boat, but took the time the next morning early while it was wind still to go and visit die beautiful town of Polençia (about 20km from the port.
All major towns were developed in the early days (of pirate attacks) a few kilometres inland from the port to give them some warning and time to prepare for the counter attack. The old town is absolutely beautifully preserved and has the typical narrow cobblestone alleyways with a lovely old church with a very interesting modern art exhibition inside.
The steps!
The steps!

The one feature in Old Pollençia that I will never forget is a flight of never-ending stairs that took us to the top of the town with a fabulous view over the valley. The plazas were seamed with little restaurants with outdoor umbrellas, tables and chairs and were too inviting to ignore! A light lunch and a beer went off quite well after the climb to the top and down.

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